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More vigils held across Ireland in memory of Aidan Moffitt and Michael Snee


More vigils were held across the country today in memory of the two men murdered earlier this week.

Large crowds turned out at gatherings in Donegal, Galway, Wicklow, Kildare and Carlow while another show of solidarity was held in London.

Books of condolences were signed in memory of Aidan Moffitt, 42, and Michael Snee, 58, who died violently in their own homes in Sligo during the week.

Read More:Thousands remember Aidan Moffitt and Michael Snee as vigils held across Ireland

Both their funerals will take place after 12pm Mass at Christ the King Church in Sligo on Monday.

The shock felt across the country was shared by Ryan Tubridy who offered his condolences to the families and friends of two men.

The Late Late Show host also sent a message of support to Ireland’s LGBTQ+ community.

He said: “We need to begin tonight by being serious for a moment and to acknowledge that it has been a harrowing and at times bewildering week in this country, as you all know.

“Sligo, tonight we’re thinking of everybody in Sligo.

“Sligo is hurting, and to be truthful about it, I think we’re all hurting a little bit after what happened this week in this country.

“I want to say that our sincerest sympathies, and I mean this, tonight go out to the friends and families of Aidan Moffitt and Michael Snee.

“But also to their neighbours, and to their communities, people who loved them where they lived in Sligo.”



Mary Lou McDonald (centre) at a vigil outside the Dail in Dublin in memory of Aidan Moffitt and Michael Snee
Mary Lou McDonald (centre) at a vigil outside the Dail in Dublin in memory of Aidan Moffitt and Michael Snee



The Bandstand, Bray - Vigil for the two Sligo men Aidan Moffitt & Michael Snee
The Bandstand, Bray – Vigil for the two Sligo men Aidan Moffitt & Michael Snee

Former President Mary McAleese said religious institutions in Ireland needed to ask themselves some tough questions about their role in the prevalence of homophobia in Irish society.

Speaking on Newstalk’s Anton Savage show she said: “There’s work to be done and we also need the kind of debate about where this hatred comes from.

“What keeps it going? What fails to challenge it?

“And I still think, regrettably, in a country where religions plays a very big role and is a huge influencer of attitudes I think the churches – and I’m not just talking about the Catholic church, I’m talking about all the major denominations – because all of them are conduits for homophobia.

“They all have questions to ask about whether or not, and to what extent, they have been conduits for hatred.”

President Michael D Higgins pointed out that despite equal marriage rights being granted to members of the LGBTQI+ community they are still subject to attacks.

He said: “Yet seven years later, when it comes to behaviour, we still hear far too regularly of members of the gay community being faced with homophobic comments and slurs.”

In a statement, the The Irish Muslim Peace and Integration Council condemned the killings and extended their condolences to the families and friends of the two men.

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